For all emergencies, call 911

 

Additional resources for support services and reporting hate crimes

Family of Woodstock Crisis Line

845-679-2485 (24-hour call center, text available from 5 a.m. – 1 a.m.)

Ulster County Crime Victims Assistance Program

845-340-3443 (Weekdays, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.) or

845-340-3442 (nights, weekends, and holidays)

 

New York City Anti-Violence Project,

212-714-1141 (24-hour, bilingual English/Spanish)

 

If you have been victimized in a hate crime or hate incident, here are some suggestions for things you should do immediately:

  • Get medical attention for any injuries.
  • Call the police as soon after the incident as possible. You may be eligible for financial compensation for damages.
  • Get the responding officer’s name and badge number.
  • Write down all details of the crime as quickly as possible after the reporting.
  • If you saw the perpetrator(s), try to remember gender, age, height, race, weight, build, clothes and other distinguishing characteristics. If anything was said, such as anti-gay epithets or threats, make a mental note about them.
  • Carefully preserve any evidence, such as notes, clothing, graffiti, tape recordings, fingerprints, etc. Take photographs of any injuries and of the location where the incident occurred.
  • If you want the crime to be reported as a hate/bias crime, tell the officer to note that on the report.
  • Make sure the officer files an incident report form and assigns a case number.
  • If the police do not assist you properly, file a complaint
  • If a police report is not taken at the time of your report, go to the police station and ask for one. Always get your own copy.

 

General Safety Tips for Reducing Risk of Hate Crime

Not every attack can be prevented but here are some basic tips to help reduce your risk. Your primary consideration should always be your safety.

STAY ALERT.

Awareness is your best self-defense; know what is happening around you. Be especially careful if you are alone or drunk.

IF YOU DECIDE TO BRING SOMEONE HOME.

Introduce them to a friend, acquaintance or bartender so that someone knows who you left with.

TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS.

If you think something is wrong, remove yourself from the situation. Trust your gut — if it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t.

WHEN WALKING, PLAN THE SAFEST AND MOST DIRECT ROUTE.

Use well-lit, busy streets. Walk with friends or a group, especially at night. Let someone know where you will be going and when you will return.

PROJECT CONFIDENCE.

Walk as if you know where you’re going. Stand tall. Walk in a confident manner, and hold your head up.

CARRY A WHISTLE.

If you feel threatened, blow your whistle, bang garbage cans, honk your horn, or shout to attract attention.

IF YOU FEEL THREATENED.

Cross the street, change direction, run to a place where there are other people, or walk closer to traffic.

IF YOU ARE BEING FOLLOWED IN A CAR, TURN AROUND AND WALK QUICKLY IN THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION.

Get the license plate number and a description, if possible. Give this to the police.